Fernando Fuster-Fabra's Blog

NOBEL PEACE AWARD: FROM OBAMA TO LIU XIAOBO, A NEVER-ENDING TALE OF CONTROVERSY | October 25, 2010

No matter how many Nobel Peace Awards have been granted, the world remains immersed in a sea of violations of human rights, incessant wars and lack of just distribution of wealth …

A year has elapsed since President Barack Obama was named the Nobel Peace awardee. It seemed then that the Norwegian-based jury granted the prize in the hope of Obama’s future contributions towards peace. Twelve months later, the advances in those issues on his White House desk have mainly remained unresolved. True to say, the Obama Administration has firmly commenced the U.S. troop withdrawal from Iraq, as promised. However, Guantanamo remains open with political prisoners accused of terrorism without democratic guarantees for their defence; nor has the White House efforts to foster Palestinian-Israeli peace talks given any significant progress.

To take over the honour of being the Nobel Peace Award in 2010, the Norwegian-based jury has elected a Chinese dissident to replace Obama as the champion of world peace. Liu Xiaobo not only remains serving a long-term imprisonment but will probably miss the Nobel Awards ceremony in his honour. Although world leaders headed by the outgoing awardee have pressured the Chinese Communist Government on the issue, as the days pass, interests seems to wane in favour of Liu Xiaobo’s release from prison.

Today, Obama is lost in the density of political meetings to try to save as many governors and congressional seats now held by Democrats. He scarcely has time to lose till the Nov. 2 mid-term elections and the dilemma created by the Norwegian-based Nobel jury on the 2010 award must be too far in the back of his mind today.

Other world leaders elsewhere have varied worries of their own trying to wade through the global crisis or local issues that require their full attention. Justified or not, each one looks for his own priorities and objectives, with little or no concern for ensuring human rights in powerful nations such as China. I wonder if their attitude would be different if the state in question was a less powerful nation with less economic and military influence on the destiny of Mankind.

Fernando Fuster-Fabra

Barcelona




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