Fernando Fuster-Fabra's Blog

A TALE OF TWO ALLIES

July 26, 2010
2 Comments

That Great Britain and the United States of America are allies is a well-known fact no one questions. Nevertheless, it is likewise true that the USA once was part of the defunct British Empire and fought the Redcoats to declare its independence on July 4th, 1776.

Two world wars brought the USA and the UK together across the Atlantic, in an alliance against those forces considered contrary to freedom and democracy. This alliance triumphed in both wars provoked by confrontations amongst European leaders in search of world supremacy. Borders have since then been moved and colonies reorganised. The alliance claims that it has served the interests of Mankind in the preservation of peace.

Such feat is only in part true. The tale these allies relate has a more profound lecture and a far deeper truth.

Way before the generation Barack Obama and David Cameron belong to could ever dream of attempting to lead the world as they are today, the USA and the UK carried out both positive and negative political actions that have compromised freedom and peace the world over. In their favour is the supremacy of the democratic system in major part of the developed states of the globe. In the negative side of the balance are the inherited conflicts some countries have to bear with as a consequence of erroneous decolonisation processes in various continents. One such process is clearly reflected in the present-day tense situation between Israel and the Palestinian Authority which dates back to 1917.

Supremacy for decades has been linked to control of energetic sources and it is a well-known fact that during the greater part of the 20th century it has been British and American consortiums dubbed ‘The Seven Sisters’ that controlled petroleum supply the world over. Today, three months after the BP Gulf of Mexico oil spill and the ecological disaster for the gulf area coastline, the USA and the UK still are allies with a sensitive friction point as far as the respective citizenry are concerned.

For Brits, the severe US stance on imposing BP a costly salvage scheme has a far deeper effect on private pension fund holders where British Petroleum stocks is a priority asset. Thus, the reactions have been one of total rejection to the White House curt discourse demanding responsibility and claiming indemnification. Furthermore, with Cameron seeking severe budget cuts, Britons are each day more inclined to pursue a total withdrawal not only from the Iraq fiasco but likewise from the Afghanistan front.

What once united Great Britain and the United States of America – petroleum and ‘just wars’ – may now be the very cause that may slowly cause a crevasse between two strong allies.

Fernando Fuster-Fabra

Barcelona

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